Susan G. Komen grants $81,757 to SOMC’s Hands of Hope program

The Columbus Affiliate of Susan G. Komen for the Cure recently announced they would be awarding Southern Ohio Medical Center $81,757 to support the hospital’s Hands of Hope Program.

“We are extremely grateful to have the continued support of Susan G. Komen for the Cure,” SOMC Director of Cancer Services Wendi Waugh said. “This is the largest amount they’ve given us to date, and it will ensure that local women without insurance or underinsured women can still receive their annual mammograms without the fear of medical bills.”

Hands of Hope is a grant-funded program at SOMC that provides free services such as mammograms and clinical breast exams. The program also seeks to educate women 40 years and older about the importance of early breast cancer detection, while supplying those already diagnosed with guidance and support.

“We recently learned through a community survey that even though there has been a tremendous effort in the area to educate women on the importance of annual mammograms our screening rate is still lower than other areas in Ohio and the nation.  Early detection is key to improving survival rates. Through the Hands of Hope program, we are helping promote early detection by providing resources and removing financial obstacles wherever we can,” Waugh said.

When treated early, the five-year breast cancer survival rate is 98 percent.

“The financial support from our organization serves as a safety-net for women in our service area, allowing the funded organizations to deliver services to women who would not be able to afford them,” Julie McMahon, director of mission at Komen Columbus, said.

The SOMC Breast Navigator can be reached at 740-356-PINK. To learn more, visit www.somc.org/cancer or like SOMC on Facebook at www.facebook.com/SouthernOhioMedicalCenter.

A good night’s sleep is more important than you may think

With many people juggling hectic schedules and working long days, it can sometimes be hard to find time for a good night’s sleep. However, getting enough sleep is more important that some people may realize. That is why March 3 – 10 has been designated as Sleep Awareness Week.

While the amount of sleep you need varies from person to person, on average most adults require between 7 and 8 hours per night. When you obtain less sleep than you require, you go into “sleep debt.” Like all debts, this will have to be repaid – with interest. The more sleep you miss, the more sleep you will require.

Contrary to what many people believe, you cannot simply “get used” to sleeping less without suffering adverse consequences. Tests have shown that sleep-deprived individuals actually perform tasks as poorly or worse than people who are intoxicated. Specifically, sleep deprivation will negatively impact your:

  • Attention
  • Vigilance
  • Memory
  • Decision making
  • Reaction/Response times
  • Judgment

And despite popular opinion, it is not possible to cancel out these effects with caffeine or other stimulants. The impact of sleep deprivation does not end with cognitive functions, either. It has very real, and very serious, health implications.

It is believed that sleep deprivation may affect the immune system, making you more vulnerable to common viral illnesses, obesity, heart disease, depression and even diabetes.

REM sleep also lets the brain replenish the mechanisms for memory, learning, performance and problem solving. This means that if you get less than 6 hours of sleep, it may prevent you from retaining information.

The importance of a good night’s sleep is great, as are the consequences for not achieving it. If you believe that you may suffer from a condition that is causing you to experience sleep deprivation, contact the SOMC Sleep Lab at 740-356-8822.

SOMC to host “Matters of the Mind” health screenings

Southern Ohio Medical Center will be hosting “Matters of the Mind,” a special event that offers free health screenings related to the brain and neurological system, on March 5 from 2 until 6 p.m. at the SOMC Friends Center.

The event will feature cognitive screenings, hearing screenings, balance assessment, evaluations for risk of falling or stroke and more.

Following the screenings, there will be presentations from SOMC physician specialists and nurse practitioners. Each presentation will be followed by a question and answer session.

To learn more about “Matters of the Mind,” or to schedule an appointment for a free health screening, call 740-356-2794. Pre-registration is required and must be completed by March 1.

SOMC announces results of Community Valentine

Southern Ohio Medical Center recently announced the final results of its ‘Community Valentine,’ in which SOMC pledged donations to five local organizations in accordance with how many votes each received in a poll on the hospital’s Facebook fan page. Because of the overwhelming response the poll received, SOMC has rounded up each organization’s donation to the nearest thousand.

SOMC is donating $4,000 to the Steven A. Hunter Hope Fund; $4,000 to Sierra’s Haven; $1,000 to Scioto County 4-H; $1,000 to the Ohio River Valley Chapter of the American Red Cross; and $1,000 to the Stepping Stones House.

Pictured together are representatives from all five organizations, alongside SOMC President and CEO Randy Arnett. From left to right; Josi Brodt and Jo Williams with Scioto County 4-H, Dr. Gail Counts with Sierra’s Haven, Randy Arnett, Virgie Hunter with the Steven A. Hunter Hope Fund, Dan Castle with Sierra’s Haven, Mark Hunter with the Steven A. Hunter Hope Fund, Mary Irwin with the Stepping Stones House and Elijah Allen with the Ohio River Valley Chapter of the American Red Cross.

 

SOMC’s stars ready to shine for Red Cross

Although the event won’t take place until March, voting has already begun for “Dancing with Our Stars,” a local dance competition that serves as a fundraiser for the Ohio River Valley Chapter of the American Red Cross.

The event features two ‘stars’ from Southern Ohio Medical Center: Wendi Waugh and Dr. Nathan Bennington.

Neither Waugh nor Dr. Bennington benefit from formal dance training, and both have admitted to being a bit surprised by how steep the learning curve can be. However, they’re both excited to be developing new skills and using them to help an organization like the Red Cross.

“Keeping in mind that it’s for charity makes it easier,” Waugh said. “I’m all about whatever I can do for the community.”

Waugh is the director of the SOMC Cancer Services/Community Health and Wellness. In that capacity, she works to provide screenings and wellness opportunities for the community. That includes events such as 2012’s ‘Tri for Your LIFE’ triathlon, which attracted more than 100 competitors with some coming from as far away as Florida and Minnesota.

Waugh’s primary goal may be to raise funds for the Red Cross, but there is one other goal she’d like to accomplish – she’d like to win.

“I feel like I’m putting a lot of hours into this, and I hope that in the end my partner and I look like professional dancers,” Waugh said. “In fact, I want to do so well that they ask me to dance as a professional next year.”

In order to do that, she has spent many hours with her dance partner, Dan Gray, learning the cha-cha. Dr. Bennington has also invested considerable time into learning to dance.

“I have never taken dance lessons or done anything like that. Trying to learn dancing from somebody else is definitely foreign to me,” Dr. Bennington said.

His partner, Debbie Kielmar, is the Group Fitness Supervisor at the SOMC LIFE Center and has put together their routine for the competition. Dr. Bennington is careful, however, not to reveal too much about their plans.

“All I’m going to say is that ours is going to be the most unique,” Dr. Bennington said. “It won’t be ballroom dancing, let’s put it that way.”

Like Waugh, Dr. Bennington has a history of community service and involvement that motivates him to help raise funds for the Red Cross. In fact, Dr. Bennington was a recipient of the Red Cross’ Humanitarian Award in 2012. He received the honor along with Dr. George Pettit after the duo traveled to the Philippines for a medical mission that included removing a 33-pound tumor.

Votes can already be cast online for both Wendi Waugh and Dr. Nathan Bennington, but each vote requires a $1 donation to the Red Cross.

To support Wendi Waugh, visit http://ow.ly/hvZBw.

To support Dr. Nathan Bennington, visit http://ow.ly/hvZE0.

Additional information can be found by liking SOMC on Facebook at www.facebook.com/SouthernOhioMedicalCenter.

SOMC begins mammogram self-referral program

Women are now able to receive mammograms at Southern Ohio Medical Center without a physician order, thanks to SOMC’s new self-referral program.

Under the new program, women who are at least 40 years of age can schedule a screening mammogram for prevention and early detection of breast disease. However, women who detect lumps or other causes for concern can schedule their mammogram at SOMC regardless of age.

“Through this program, we’re providing patients with easier access to screenings,” Noel Pemberton, SOMC’s administrative director of medical imaging, said. “The process to schedule self-referrals will be handled through Central Scheduling. It will be the same process patients use to schedule an appointment with a doctor’s order.”

The self-referral program has been approved by the Ohio Department of Health and began on February 4.

“It is our goal to detect breast cancer as early as possible,” Pemberton said. “We believe this program will help us do just that.”

To schedule a self-referral, contact SOMC Central Scheduling at 740-356-8128.

SOMC hosting Relax with Heart event on February 19

SOMC will host its eighth annual heart awareness program, Relax with Heart, from 2 to 6:30 p.m. Feb. 19 at the Friends Center.

“Relax with Heart will focus on the many ways you can easily reduce stress and unwind,” Amy Fraulini, director of SOMC Heart and Vascular Services, said. “Stress affects each of us differently but there are many healthy habits we can form to protect us from the damage it may cause.”

Relax with Heart will offer the public opportunities to learn how to relax through low-impact exercise, massage therapy, and spa treatments and will also include screenings for total cholesterol, blood sugar, blood pressure, body mass index (optional), and a heart risk analysis.

The event is free, though pre-registration is required. For more information or to schedule your appointment, please call 740-356-7665.

Dr. Khoury establishes SSU scholarship fund

SOMC’s Dr. Thomas Khoury has established a scholarship at Shawnee State University for students who are studying poetry. Dr. Khoury established the fund in honor of his uncle, Dr. James Barbar, who was a poet, an educator and a lawyer. SSU has placed a plaque recognizing Dr. Barbar in the Clark Memorial Library.

Seen here with the plaque are SSU Coordinator of Creative Writing, Neil Carpathios, SSU President Dr. Rita Rice Morris, Dr. Thomas Khoury, SSU Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences Dr. Timothy Scheurer and SSU Provost Dr. David Todt.

SOMC Partnering with Nationwide Children’s Hospital for Pediatrics, Neonatal Care

Southern Ohio Medical Center has announced it will be partnering with Nationwide Children’s Hospital to bring additional resources and care to pediatric and neonatal patients.

“We consider it our responsibility to make sure our community has access to the best care possible, and this new affiliation will help us do just that,” Randy Arnett, president and CEO of SOMC, said. “By combining the resources and expertise of Nationwide Children’s Hospital with that of our current pediatricians, we can bring our patients a higher level of pediatric care and service.”

As part of the affiliation, SOMC will be able to directly consult with specialists at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio. SOMC’s medical staff will also benefit from training and mentoring programs as well as state-of-the-art pediatric research and clinical trials.

“Together, SOMC and Nationwide Children’s Hospital will build upon the tremendous care already provided by our current pediatricians,” Arnett said. “They will be able to provide even greater care by taking advantage of Nationwide Children’s telemedicine services and pediatric and neonatology expertise.

“Our hospitals will also be able to work together to place graduating residents from Nationwide Children’s Hospital right here in southern Ohio, which will directly impact the quality of care available at SOMC.”

“We are looking forward to our formal collaboration with Southern Ohio Medical Center,” said Gil Peri, vice president of Regional Development at Nationwide Children’s Hospital.  “We will bring our pediatric expertise to the community working closely with local pediatricians to enhance care in the Portsmouth and surrounding communities.  Together we can improve the health of the neonatal and pediatric community we serve.”

Nationwide Children’s Hospital

Ranked 7th of only 12 children’s hospitals on U.S.News & World Report’s 2012-13 “America’s Best Children’s Hospitals Honor Roll,” Nationwide Children’s Hospital is one of the nation’s largest not-for-profit freestanding pediatric healthcare networks providing wellness, preventive, diagnostic, treatment and rehabilitative care for infants, children, and adolescents, as well as adult patients with congenital disease. In June 2012, the hospital celebrated completion of the largest pediatric expansion construction project in United States history, adding 2.1 million square feet of clinical, research and support facilities to total 5.3 million square feet on its main campus.  A medical staff of 1,100 and 8,300 employees provide state-of-the-art pediatric care for nearly one million patient visits annually. As home to the Department of Pediatrics of The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Nationwide Children’s Hospital physicians train the next generation of pediatricians and pediatric specialists. The Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital is one of the top 10 National Institutes of Health-funded freestanding pediatric research facilities. Nationwide Children’s remains true to the original mission since its founding in 1892 of providing care regardless of a family’s ability to pay. More information is available at NationwideChildrens.org.